Cemeteries

Cemeteries are more than a repository of caskets. They are memorials to generations past, and sometimes to more than that. In many ways they embody history itself. While each of our cemetery articles strives to include current information about the decedents buried there, they also try to include relevant information about the cemetery itself. Read more about what cemetery articles may include below.

Alexander McLaughlin cemetery
Altus City cemetery
Beech Grove cemetery
Belt cemetery
Bercham cemetery
Berkley cemetery
Blanscet cemetery
Bourland cemetery
Boydston cemetery
Brewer cemetery
Brown’s Chapel cemetery
Burnett cemetery
Burrell cemetery
Burt cemetery
Campbell cemetery
Carpenter cemetery
Cass cemetery
Cecil cemetery
cemetery Ridge
Childers cemetery
Cobb Homeplace cemetery
Coles Chapel cemetery
Council cemetery
Crossno cemetery
Dick Hill cemetery
Duncan cemetery
Elias Turner cemetery
English cemetery
Eubanks cemetery
Fleeman cemetery
Forbus cemetery
Gage cemetery
Gar Creek cemetery
Garden Memorial cemetery
Greenwood cemetery
Hamm cemetery
Hampton cemetery
Handchew cemetery
Harmon cemetery
Harris cemetery
Henderson cemetery
Highland cemetery
Hight cemetery
Hixson cemetery
Houston cemetery
Hunter cemetery
Jackson cemetery
Kersey cemetery
King cemetery
Lessley cemetery
Liberty cemetery
Locke cemetery
Lone Pine cemetery
Lowes Creek cemetery
McIlroy cemetery
McLaughlin cemetery
McNelly cemetery
Moffett cemetery
Morgan cemetery (Morgan Twp.)
Morgan cemetery (McIlroy Twp.)
Morgan Hill cemetery
Mount Hope cemetery
Mountain View cemetery
Nichols Chapel cemetery
Nichols Family cemetery
Nixon cemetery
Oak Grove cemetery
Oak Ridge cemetery
Parks cemetery
Patterson cemetery
Phillips cemetery
Pilot Grove cemetery
Pleasant View cemetery
Plymale Barnes cemetery
Pond Creek cemetery
Price Springs cemetery
Quesenbury cemetery
Rankin cemetery
Rebecca Lewis cemetery
Ridge cemetery
Roger cemetery
Sacred Heart cemetery
Saint Anthony cemetery
Saint Mary’s Catholic cemetery
Shiloh cemetery
Shores cemetery
Singleton cemetery
Spencer cemetery
Tate cemetery
Threadgill cemetery
Turner cemetery
Turners Bend cemetery
Van Brunt cemetery
Wagner cemetery
Westview cemetery
Whitson cemetery
Williams cemetery
Younger cemetery

 

What to include

cemetery articles conveniently collect information about the cemetery in one location, and where possible include all the ‘metadata’ that a genealogist might want to know about a cemetery. Of course it is rare that all the possible variables are known, but when possible these are the items of information which we would like to make available:

  • Official name
  • Unofficial names, ‘also known as’, previous names.
  • Type, which usually falls into three classes – religious, private, or government (most often municipal, state, or federal/national.)
  • Url – yes, many have official websites. Do not report unofficial websites, such as find-a-grave or historical society webpages, as these links seem to break regularly.
  • Contact information – phone number, e-mail address, contact form url, etc.
  • The physical location
    • Address (street or postal)
    • Geodetic data (longitude, latitude)
    • Genealogical hierarchical location. (e.g. Bethlehem cemetery, Agder Township, Marshall County, Minnesota, United States.)
    • Platted location, usually a Township Range and section description.
  • Quantitative data
    • Size in area
    • Number of interments (this total must be dated, as the number may change.)
    • Active or inactive? An active cemetery is one still accepting interments.
  • Organization/ownership
    • May have a separate address, phone number, website
  • How to get there (usually driving instructions.)
  • Notes
  • Registry of interments
    • Metadata about the registry or survey
      • When was it done initially
      • Who did it initially
      • When was it last updated
      • Who updated it last
    • Individual graves
      • Type, and this could be an essay by itself, but generally in-ground, above ground, a crypt or vault (generally a part of another structure, usually under it), a mausoleum, columbarium or tomb (building-like structure), or tumulus (barrow, cairn, or mound)
      • Who, including known date of birth, date of death, date of burial, and notes
      • Marker, type, description, inscription(s)
      • Address or location within the cemetery

If you have this kind of information, feel free to jump in here to adopt a cemetery!